Senior Handbook

Version updated 16.08.2022

Welcome to Senior School

Welcome to Senior School

Dear Parents, Carers and Students,

Gilroy Santa Maria College offers its students a wide range of subjects to cover a diverse range of student abilities, skills and interests. This high degree of flexibility and choice, combined with excellent facilities and resources, provides ample opportunity for every student to experience success and to pursue multiple career pathways to the future. 

The study options available in Senior Secondary include:

  • General subjects (preparation for tertiary entrance)
  • Applied subjects (practical/skill based subjects)
  • Vocational Education & Training (VET) certificate courses (direct entry into the workforce or for further education and training)
  • Support with school-based apprenticeship or traineeship
  • Recognised subjects/courses from other universities and training organisations
  • A combination of both

This Senior Schooling Handbook (Years 11 & 12) is designed to guide students and their families in the academic decisions required to be made before and leading into the senior phase of their schooling.

All students will work towards a Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE), earning points for the completion of all subjects and courses. Students are able to select 2 pathways - Vocational or ATAR.  The Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) is the  primary mechanism used nationally for tertiary admissions and indicates a student’s position relative to other students.  It is the standard measure of a student’s overall academic achievement in relation to other students.Tertiary bound students will need to study a minimum of five general subjects or four general subjects plus a combination of Applied and Certificate III courses to be eligible to receive an ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank). Students are also encouraged to view university entrance requirements.  Students not looking for university entry are encouraged to choose subjects they enjoy and will be successful in, that will provide them with a post-school pathway. Students may combine their studies with work experience and/or placement, school based apprenticeships or traineeships. Vocational students will participate in a work placement program every Friday that will provide them with authentic work experience in the industry/s of their interest.

Parents/Carers and students are advised to use these questions as the foundation for discerning and making decisions about subject/course selections. Attempting to predict the so-called ATAR value of certain subjects is not a strength-based approach to subject selection, which can lead to significant challenges in the future.

Success in Years 11 and 12 is more likely if students elect subjects/courses of study in which they have an interest and aptitude for.➚

I trust this handbook will provide the information needed to make your academic decisions, whilst remembering we have key staff available to discuss your queries at any time.

I wish you all the best during this time of decision-making as your child embarks on their final years of school at Gilroy Santa Maria College.

Yours Sincerely,

Principal

Kevin Barnes

General Information

This booklet has been compiled to assist parents and students to make appropriate decisions about subject choices for Year 11 and 12. Students are strongly advised to read each subject synopsis carefully before making subject choices. Included in the booklet is some background information on the system of Senior Schooling in Queensland and brief information on each subject the College offers. Information about individual subjects has been supplied by Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority (QCAA) and prepared by our Academic Leaders.

QCAA Information

Senior Education Profile

Students in Queensland are issued with a Senior Education Profile (SEP) upon completion of senior studies. This profile may include a:

          statement of results

          Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE)

          Queensland Certificate of Individual Achievement (QCIA).

For more information about the SEP see:

www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/senior/certificates-qualifications/sep

Statement Of Results

Students are issued with a statement of results in Decemberin the December following the completion of a QCAA-developed course of study. A new statement of results is issued to students after each QCAA-developed course of study is completed.

A full record of study will be issued, along with the QCE qualification, in the first December or July after the student meets the requirements for a QCE.

Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE)

Students may be eligible for a Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) at the end of their senior schooling. Students who do not meet the QCE requirements can continue to work towards the certificate post-secondary schooling. The QCAA awards a QCE in the following July or December, once a student becomes eligible. Learning accounts are closed after nine years; however, a student may apply to the QCAA to have the account reopened and all credit continued.

For more information about the SEP see:

https://www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/downloads/senior/snr_new_assess_te_qce_factsheet_requirements.pdf

Queensland Certificate of Individual Achievement (QCIA)

Queensland Certificate of Individual Achievement (QCIA) reports the learning achievements of eligible students who complete an individual learning program. At the end of the senior phase of learning, eligible students achieve a QCIA. These students have the option of continuing to work towards a QCE post-secondary schooling.

Senior Subjects

The QCAA develops four types of senior subject syllabuses — General, Applied, Senior External Examinations and Short Courses. Results in General and Applied subjects contribute to the award of a QCE and may contribute to an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) calculation, although no more than one result in an Applied subject can be used in the calculation of a student’s ATAR.

Extension subjects are extensions of the related General subjects and are studied either concurrently with, or after, Units 3 and 4 of the General course.

Typically, it is expected that most students will complete these courses across Years 11 and 12. All subjects build on the P–10 Australian Curriculum.

General Syllabuses

General subjects are suited to students who are interested in pathways beyond senior secondary schooling that lead primarily to tertiary studies but also to pathways for vocational education and training and work. General subjects include Extension subjects.

Applied Syllabuses

Applied subjects are suited to students who are primarily interested in pathways beyond senior secondary schooling that lead to vocational education and training or work.

Senior External Examination

The Senior External Examination consists of individual subject examinations provided across Queensland in October and November each year by the QCAA.

Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) eligibility

The calculation of an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) will be based on a student’s:

          best five General subject results, or

          best results in a combination of four General subject results plus an Applied subject result or a Certificate III or higher VET qualification.

The Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre (QTAC) has responsibility for ATAR calculations.

English Requirement

Eligibility for an ATAR will require satisfactory completion of a QCAA English subject.

Satisfactory completion will require students to attain a result that is equivalent to a Sound Level of Achievement in one of the two English subjects — English or Essential English.

While students must meet this standard to be eligible to receive an ATAR, it is not mandatory for a student’s English result to be included in the calculation of their ATAR.

Choosing a Pathway

Students can choose from a wide range of learning options that will help them in whatever pathway they choose after school — whether they want to do further study, take up an apprenticeship or traineeship, or enter the workforce.

Careers Services

At Gilroy Santa Maria College we have a Career Adviser to assistassists help students and parents/carers through the important process of career planning. Assistance is commonly provided for subject selections, post-school pathway decisions and tertiary applications.

There is a dedicated Vocational Education Officer to help students arrange Work Experience, Work Placement, School-Based Traineeships or Apprenticeships.

An extensive range of career and tertiary pathway information is available from the Careers Room.

Choosing Subjects

It is important to choose senior subjects carefully as your decisions may affect your success at school, your feelings and motivation and how you feel about completing Senior.

Which Subjects?

An overall plan is to choose subjects which:

          Consider your interest and ability.

          Will develop skills, knowledge and attitudes useful throughout your life.

In most cases, the best subjects to take are the ones you like the most. From these subjects, you are more likely to do well and therefore get higher marks. If you really don’t like a subject, you probably won’t do as well.

How not to decide

Do not choose a subject because:

          Your friends are taking it. Your friends may have different abilities, interests and motivations to you.

          Your favourite teacher is teaching it. Teachers often change classes or even schools.

          You want to go on a particular excursion. You could endure years of misery for the sake of that excursion.

          You’ve heard it’s a “soft” subject. If someone tells you a subject is soft, chances are that they have a poor work ethic.

          You need to do it even though you hate it. If you need to do a subject to get into a particular course, there will be a lot of that subject within the course!

          You will get a higher ATAR score. The only way to get your best ATAR is to get good grades in subjects you enjoy.

Vocational Education and Training (VET)

Vocational Education and Training (VET) includes those courses which consist of a national qualification at certificate levels I, II or III. When a student studies VET the Registered Training Organisation (RTO) is responsible for all training, assessment and certification related to the course. The RTO is responsible for issuing a Statement of Attainment or a Certificate and Statement of Results. Students can undertake VET Qualifications either through Gilroy Santa Maria College as the Registered Training Organisation or with an external provider.

VET courses focuses on delivering skills and knowledge required for specific industries.

Every VET course is competency-based. The electives often have a more practical focus, targeting vocational skills relevant to the workplace. VET Qualifications at Certificate III level or above may also contribute towards an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR).

School-based Apprenticeships and Traineeships

School-based traineeships allow students in Years 10, 11 or 12, to work for an employer and train towards a recognised qualification, while completing their secondary schooling and studying for their Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE). A traineeship typically takes 1-2 years to complete and may count as one senior subject. Traineeships are usually offered in the Hospitality and Business industry. 

School-based apprenticeships allow students in Years 11 or 12 to work for an employer and train towards a recognised qualification, while completing their secondary schooling and studying for their Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE). A school-based apprenticeship begins during senior schooling, however, is not completed before the end of Year 12. After Year 12 a school-based apprenticeship transfers to full time employment with the workplace employer. A school-based apprenticeship may count as one senior subject. Apprenticeships are usually offered in the trade-based industries such as Hairdressing, Carpentry and Plumbing.

The process in gaining a school based apprenticeship or traineeship (SAT) begins with the student taking on voluntary Work Experience through either the school’s Holiday Work Experience Program or, if in Year 11 or Year 12, through the school’s Friday Work Placement Program. After experience is gained an employer may offer the student the opportunity to begin a SAT. If so, then a meeting is held between student, parent/carer, employer and the school’s VET manager to discuss. If a SBAT is secured, and the student is in Year 10 then the release time for the workplace hours is after-school, however, if the student is in Year 11 or Year 12 then is the release day for workplace hours is Friday.

For further information visit School-based - Apprenticeships Info:

http://www.apprenticeshipsinfo.qld.gov.au/school-based/index.html

Alternative Program Lines

Gilroy Santa Maria College supports students’ participation in alternative learning programs such as School-based Apprenticeships and Traineeships (SBATs) and External Courses. One way of supporting students is allowing them an Alternative Program line with the expectation that this time will be used to work on assignments and modules associated with their Certificate II or higher course.,

Work Experience

All students in Year 10 are expected to participate in a three-day Block Work Experience organised by the school. In addition, all Year 10 students are encouraged to partake in Holiday Work Experience during any of the school holiday breaks. 

Students in Year 11 and 12 that have chosen a vocational pathway (non-ATAR) must participate in the school’s Friday Work Placement Program. This involves students’ organising a workplace to attend each Friday of the school term. The focus of this program is for students to have the opportunity to gain practical, employability skills that align with their course and future employment field. Friday Work Placement is mandatory for all Vocational Pathway students.

Work Eexperience is offered to all students regardless of their chosen pathway of study in Senior and is invaluable in deciding on a particular occupation and/or study options

Studying University Courses while at School

Studying University courses while at high school gives students a taste of University life. Students can focus on particular areas that may not be offered through their school or take an area of interest further. Courses successfully completed can be credited towards further study at university, giving them a head start on their tertiary study while also providing entry into university after you graduate high school. Fees are reduced whilst studying University courses at school. 

Applications for any of the programs outlined below are made through the Careers Adviser.

Central Queensland University (CQU) - Start Uni Now (SUN) program

Over 40 subjects are available from CQ University's online course program for students in Year 10 (Term 3 only), Year 11 and Year 12.

The first subject through the SUN Program is free (additional resource fees and textbook costs may apply).

https://www.cqu.edu.au/courses/study-information/work-and-study-preparation/sun

 

JCU Start Program

JCU NOW is for high achieving Year 11 and Year 12 students who want to be ready today for tomorrow by completing first year university subjects alongside their high school studies.

  • Students can only enrol in one JCU NOW subject per teaching period (semester or trimester).
  • Maximum number of subject’s students can complete under the JCU NOW program is 4 subjects over 4 teaching periods (semester or trimester).
  • For subsequent JCU NOW subjects, another application form must be completed by the application closing date for each teaching period.
  • A limited number of places are available in each subject to ensure the cohort size is limited.

https://www.jcu.edu.au/jcu-now/subjects

QCAA Senior Syllabus Subjects

Subject offerings may include:

Mathematics

English

GENERAL

GENERAL

General Mathematics

English

Mathematical Methods

Literature

Specialist Mathematics

APPLIED

APPLIED

Essential English

Essential Mathematics

 

Science

Technologies

GENERAL

GENERAL

Biology

Design

Chemistry

Digital Solutions

Physics

APPLIED

APPLIED

Industrial Graphics Skills

Agricultural Practices

Information Communication Technologies

Humanities

Physical Education

GENERAL

GENERAL

Accounting

Physical Education

Business

 

Economics

Arts

Modern History

GENERAL

 

Visual Art

APPLIED

Drama

Religion and Ethics

 

 

APPLIED

                                                       

Visual Arts in Practice

VET Subjects

Certificate I in Automotive Preparation AUR10120
Certificate II in Engineering Pathways MEM20413
Certificate II in Retail Cosmetics SHB20116
Certificate II in Salon Assistant SHB20216
Certificate II in Hospitality SIT20322 through a third party agreement with Townsville Catholic Education (RTO Code 31195)
Certificate I in Construction CPC10120 through a third party agreement with Townsville Catholic Education (RTO Code 31195)
Certificate III in School Based Education Support CHC30221 through a third party agreement with Townsville Catholic Education (RTO Code 31195)
Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care CHC30121 through a third party agreement with Townsville Catholic Education (RTO Code 31195)
Certificate II in Health Support Services HLT23215 through a third party agreement with Connect n Grow (RTO Code 40518)
Certificate III in Health Services Assistant HLT33115 through a third party agreement with Connect n Grow (RTO Code 40518)
Certificate II in Electrotechnology (Career Start) UEE22020 through a third party agreement with Electrogroup (RTO Code 30185)
Certificate II in Sport and Recreation SIS20115 and Certificate III in Sport and Recreation SIS30115 through a third party agreement with Binnacle Training (RTO Code 31319)
Certificate III in Business BSB30120 through a third party agreement with Binnacle Training (RTO Code 31319)

General Senior Secondary Subjects

GENERAL

ACCOUNTING – General Subject

Accounting provides opportunities for students to develop an understanding of the essential role of organising, analysing and communicating financial data and information in the successful performance of any organisation.

Students learn fundamental accounting concepts in order to understand accrual accounting and managerial and accounting controls, preparing internal financial reports, ratio analysis and interpretation of internal and external financial reports. They synthesise financial data and other information, evaluate accounting practices, solve authentic accounting problems, make decisions and communicate recommendations.

Students develop numerical, literacy, technical, financial, critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills. They develop an understanding of the ethical attitudes and values required to participate effectively and responsibly in a changing business environment.

Pathways

A course of study in Accounting can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of accounting, business, management, banking, finance, law, economics and commerce. As the universal language of business, Accounting provides students with a variety of future opportunities, enabling a competitive advantage in entrepreneurship and business management in many types of industry, both internationally and locally.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  describe accounting concepts and principles

  explain accounting concepts, principles and processes

  apply accounting principles and processes

  analyse and interpret financial data and information to draw conclusions

  evaluate accounting practices to make decisions and propose recommendations

  synthesise and solve accounting problems

  create responses that communicate meaning to suit purpose and audience.

Prerequisites and Recommendations: It is recommended that students have achieved at least a C standard in Year 10 English and Preparation for General Maths.

Structure

Year 11

Year 12

Real world accounting

Management effectiveness

Monitoring a business

Accounting – the big picture

  Accounting for a service business – cash, accounts payable and no GST

    Accounting for a trading GST business

      Managing resources for a trading GST business – non-current assets

  Cash management

  End of month reporting for a service business

  End of year reporting for a trading GST business

      Fully classified financial statement reporting for a GST business

  Complete accounting process for a trading GST business

 

 

 

  Performance analysis of a listed public company

 

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students complete four summative assessments.  The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

Summative Assessment

Unit 3

Unit 4

Summative internal assessment 1 (IA1):

• Examination – combination response

25%

Summative internal assessment 3 (IA3):  

• Project – cash management

25%

Summative internal assessment 2 (IA2):

  Examination – short response

25%

Summative external assessment (EA):  

• Examination – short response

25%

BIOLOGY – General Subject

Biology provides opportunities for students to engage with living systems.

In Unit 1, students develop their understanding of cells and multicellular organisms.

In Unit 2, they engage with the concept of maintaining the internal environment.

In Unit 3, students study biodiversity and the interconnectedness of life.

This knowledge is linked in Unit 4 with the concepts of heredity and the continuity of life.

Students will learn valuable skills required for the scientific investigation of questions. In addition, they will become citizens who are better informed about the world around them and who have the critical skills to evaluate and make evidence-based decisions about current scientific issues.

Biology aims to develop students’:

  •         sense of wonder and curiosity about life
  •         respect for all living things and the environment
  •         understanding of how biological systems interact and are interrelated, the flow of matter and energy through and between these systems, and the processes by which they persist and change
  •         understanding of major biological concepts, theories and models related to biological systems at all scales, from subcellular processes to ecosystem dynamics
  •         appreciation of how biological knowledge has developed over time and continues to develop; how scientists use biology in a wide range of applications; and how biological knowledge influences society in local, regional and global contexts
  •         ability to plan and carry out fieldwork, laboratory and other research investigations, including the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data and the interpretation of evidence
  •         ability to use sound, evidence-based arguments creatively and analytically when evaluating claims and applying biological knowledge
  •         ability to communicate biological understanding, findings, arguments and conclusions using appropriate representations, modes and genres.

 

Pathways

Biology is a General subject suited to students who are interested in pathways beyond school that lead to tertiary studies. A course of study in Biology can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of medicine, forensics, veterinary, food and marine sciences, agriculture, biotechnology, environmental rehabilitation, biosecurity, quarantine, conservation and sustainability.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  describe and explain scientific concepts, theories, models and systems and their limitations

  apply understanding of scientific concepts, theories, models and systems within their limitations

  analyse evidence

  interpret evidence

  investigate phenomena

  evaluate processes, claims and conclusions

  communicate understandings, findings, arguments and conclusions.

 

Prerequisites and Recommendations:

It is recommended that students have achieved at least a B standard in Year 10 in Science and Mathematics.

 

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students complete four summative assessments.  The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

Summative Assessment

CHEMISTRY – General Subject

Chemistry is the study of materials and their properties and structure.

In Unit 1, students study atomic theory, chemical bonding, and the structure and properties of elements and compounds.

In Unit 2, students explore intermolecular forces, gases, aqueous solutions, acidity and rates of reaction.

In Unit 3, students study equilibrium processes and redox reactions.

In Unit 4, students explore organic chemistry, synthesis and design to examine the characteristic chemical properties and chemical reactions displayed by different classes of organic compounds.

Chemistry aims to develop students’:

  • interest in and appreciation of chemistry and its usefulness in helping to explain phenomena and solve problems encountered in their ever-changing world
  • understanding of the theories and models used to describe, explain and make predictions about chemical systems, structures and properties
  • understanding of the factors that affect chemical systems and how chemical systems can be controlled to produce desired products
  • appreciation of chemistry as an experimental science that has developed through independent and collaborative research, and that has significant impacts on society and implications for decision-making
  • expertise in conducting a range of scientific investigations, including the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, and the interpretation of evidence
  • ability to critically evaluate and debate scientific arguments and claims in order to solve problems and generate informed, responsible and ethical conclusions
  • ability to communicate chemical understanding and findings to a range of audiences, including through the use of appropriate representations, language and nomenclature.

 

Pathways

Chemistry is a General subject suited to students who are interested in pathways beyond school that lead to tertiary studies.  A course of study in Chemistry can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of forensic science, environmental science, engineering, medicine, pharmacy and sports science.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  describe and explain scientific concepts, theories, models and systems and their limitations

  apply understanding of scientific concepts, theories, models and systems within their limitations

  analyse evidence

  interpret evidence

  investigate phenomena

  evaluate processes, claims and conclusions

  communicate understandings, findings, arguments and conclusions.

Prerequisites and Recommendations:

It is recommended that students have achieved at least a B standard in Year 10 in Science and Mathematics.

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students, complete four summative assessments.  The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

Summative Assessment

DESIGN – General Subject

Design focuses on the application of design thinking to envisage creative products, services and environments in response to human needs, wants and opportunities. Designing is a complex and sophisticated form of problem-solving that uses divergent and convergent thinking strategies that can be practised and improved. Designers are separated from the constraints of production processes to allow them to appreciate and exploit new innovative ideas.

Students learn how design has influenced the economic, social and cultural environment in which they live. They understand the agency of humans in conceiving and imagining possible futures through design. Collaboration, teamwork and communication are crucial skills needed to work in design teams and liaise with stakeholders. They learn the value of creativity and build resilience as they experience iterative design processes, where the best ideas may be the result of trial and error and a willingness to take risks and experiment with alternatives.

Students learn about and experience design through exploring needs, wants and opportunities; developing ideas and design concepts; using drawing and low-fidelity prototyping skills; and evaluating ideas and design concepts. They communicate design proposals to suit different audiences.

Pathways

A course of study in Design can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of architecture, digital media design, fashion design, graphic design, industrial design, interior design and landscape architecture.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  describe design problems and design criteria

  represent ideas, design concepts and design information using drawing and low-fidelity prototyping

  analyse needs, wants and opportunities using data

  devise ideas in response to design problems

  synthesise ideas and design information to propose design concepts

  evaluate ideas and design concepts to make refinements

  make decisions about and use mode-appropriate features, language and conventions for particular purposes and contexts.

Prerequisites and Recommendations: Nil

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students, complete four summative assessments.  The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

Summative Assessment

ECONOMICS – General Subject

The discipline of Economics is integral to every aspect of our lives: our employment opportunities, business operations and living standards. The subject challenges us to use evidence and be innovative when solving problems in a world of complex global relationships and trends, where a knowledge of economic forces and flows leads to better decisions. In Economics, decision making is core: how to allocate and distribute scarce resources to maximise well-being.

The field of economics is typically divided into two: microeconomics being the study of individuals, households and businesses; and macroeconomics, the study of economy-wide phenomena. Within this context, students study opportunity costs, economic models and the market forces of demand and supply. These concepts are applied to real-world issues of how and why markets may be modified, and the effects of government strategies and interventions. The final units of the course dissect and interpret the complex nature of international economic relationships and the dynamics of Australia’s place in the global economy.

Pathways

Economics is a General subject suited to students who are interested in pathways beyond school that lead to tertiary studies, vocational education or work. A course of study in Economics can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of economics, econometrics, management, data analytics, business, accounting, finance, actuarial science, law, political science and journalism. Economics is an excellent complement for students who want to solve real-world science or environmental problems and participate in government policy debates. It provides a competitive advantage for career options where students are aiming for management roles and developing their entrepreneurial skills to create business opportunities as agents of innovation.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  •       comprehend economic concepts, principles and models
  •       select data and economic information from sources
  •       analyse economic issues
  •       evaluate economic outcomes
  •       create responses that communicate economic meaning

 

Prerequisites and Recommendations: Students are strongly encouraged to have achieved at least a C standard in Year 10 English and H.A.S.S.

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students, complete four summative assessments, one of which is an external exam written by QCAA. The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

 Summative Assessment

ENGLISH – General Subject

 English focuses on the study of both literary texts and non-literary texts, developing students as independent, innovative and creative learners and thinkers who appreciate the aesthetic use of language, analyze perspectives and evidence, and challenge ideas and interpretations through the analysis and creation of varied texts.

Students are offered opportunities to interpret and create texts for personal, cultural, social and aesthetic purposes. They learn how language varies according to context, purpose and audience, content, modes and mediums, and how to use it appropriately and effectively for a variety of purposes.

Students have opportunities to engage with diverse texts to help them develop a sense of themselves, their world and their place in it. Students communicate effectively in Standard Australian English for the purposes of responding to and creating texts. They make choices about generic structures, language, textual features and technologies for participating actively in literary analysis and the creation of texts in a range of modes, mediums and forms, for a variety of purposes and audiences. They explore how literary and non-literary texts shape perceptions of the world, and consider ways in which texts may reflect or challenge social and cultural ways of thinking and influence audiences.

Pathways

A course of study in English promotes open-mindedness, imagination, critical awareness and intellectual flexibility — skills that prepare students for local and global citizenship, and for lifelong learning across a wide range of contexts.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  1. use patterns and conventions of genres to achieve particular purposes in cultural contexts and social situations
  2. establish and maintain roles of the writer/speaker/signer/designer and relationships with audiences
  3. create and analyse perspectives and representations of concepts, identities, times and places
  4. make use of and analyse the ways cultural assumptions, attitudes, values and beliefs underpin texts and invite audiences to take up positions
  5. use aesthetic features and stylistic devices to achieve purposes and analyse their effects in texts
  6. select and synthesise subject matter to support perspectives 
  7. organise and sequence subject matter to achieve particular purposes
  8. use cohesive devices to emphasise ideas and connect parts of texts
  9. make language choices for particular purposes and contexts 
  10. use grammar and language structures for particular purposes
  11. use mode-appropriate features to achieve particular purposes.

Prerequisites and Recommendation: Minimum achievement of a C grade in Year 10 Preparation for General English.

 Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students, complete four summative assessments.  The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100.  Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

Summative Assessment

GENERAL MATHEMATICS – General Subject

General Mathematics’ major domains are Number & Algebra, Measurement & Geometry, Statistics and Networks & Matrices, building on the content of the P–10 Australian Curriculum.

General Mathematics is designed for students who want to extend their mathematical skills beyond Year 10 but whose future studies or employment pathways do not require calculus. Students build on and develop key mathematical ideas, including rates and percentages, concepts from financial mathematics, linear and non-linear expressions, sequences, the use of matrices and networks to model and solve authentic problems, the use of trigonometry to find solutions to practical problems, and the exploration of real-world phenomena in statistics.

Students engage in a practical approach that equips learners for their needs as future citizens. They learn to ask appropriate questions, map out pathways, reason about complex solutions, set up models and communicate in different forms. They experience the relevance of mathematics to their daily lives, communities and cultural backgrounds. They develop the ability to understand, analyse and take action regarding social issues in their world.

Pathways

A course of study in General Mathematics can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of business, commerce, education, finance, IT, social science and the arts.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  select, recall and use facts, rules, definitions and procedures drawn from Number & Algebra, Measurement & Geometry, Statistics and Networks & Matrices

  comprehend mathematical concepts and techniques drawn from Number & Algebra, Measurement & Geometry, Statistics and Networks & Matrices

  communicate using mathematical, statistical and everyday language and conventions

  evaluate the reasonableness of solutions

  justify procedures and decisions by explaining mathematical reasoning

  solve problems by applying mathematical concepts and techniques drawn from Number & Algebra, Measurement & Geometry, Statistics and Networks & Matrices.

Prerequisites and Recommendations

It is recommended that students have achieved at least a C in Year 10 “Preparation for General Mathematics” (PGM).

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students complete four summative assessments. The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A–E).

Summative Assessments

MATHEMATICAL METHODS – General Subject

Mathematical Methods’ major domains are Algebra, Functions, Relations and their graphs, Calculus and Statistics.

Mathematical Methods enables students to see the connections between mathematics and other areas of the curriculum and apply their mathematical skills to real-world problems, becoming critical thinkers, innovators and problem-solvers.

Students learn topics that are developed systematically, with increasing levels of sophistication, complexity and connection, and build on algebra, functions and their graphs, and probability from the P–10 Australian Curriculum. Calculus is essential for developing an understanding of the physical world. The domain Statistics is used to describe and analyse phenomena involving uncertainty and variation. Both are the basis for developing effective models of the world and solving complex and abstract mathematical problems.

Students develop the ability to translate written, numerical, algebraic, symbolic and graphical information from one representation to another. They make complex use of factual knowledge to successfully formulate, represent and solve mathematical problems.

Pathways

A course of study in Mathematical Methods can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of natural and physical sciences (especially physics and chemistry), mathematics and science education, medical and health sciences (including human biology, biomedical science, nanoscience and forensics), engineering (including chemical, civil, electrical and mechanical engineering, avionics, communications and mining), computer science (including electronics and software design), psychology and business.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  select, recall and use facts, rules, definitions and procedures drawn from Algebra, Functions, Relations and their graphs, Calculus and Statistics

  comprehend mathematical concepts and techniques drawn from Algebra, Functions, Relations and their graphs, Calculus and Statistics

  communicate using mathematical, statistical and everyday language and conventions

  evaluate the reasonableness of solutions

  justify procedures and decisions by explaining mathematical reasoning

  solve problems by applying mathematical concepts and techniques drawn from Algebra, Functions, Relations and their graphs, Calculus and Statistics.

Prerequisites and Recommendations

To meet the academic rigour of this course, it is recommended students have achieved at least a B in “Preparation for Mathematical Methods” (PMM) in Year 10. A graphics calculator, Casio fx-CG50AU, is a requirement for this subject.

 Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students, complete four summative assessments. The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A–E).

MODERN HISTORY – General Subject

Modern History provides opportunities for students to gain historical knowledge and understanding about some of the main forces that have contributed to the development of the Modern World and to form a historical consciousness in relation to these same forces.

Modern History enables students to empathise with others and make meaningful connections between the past, present and possible futures.

Students learn that the past is contestable and tentative. Through inquiry into ideas, movements, national experiences and international experiences they discover how the past consists of various perspectives and interpretations.

Students gain a range of transferable skills that will help them become critically literate citizens who are equipped to embrace a multicultural, pluralistic, inclusive, democratic, compassionate and sustainable future.

Pathways

A course of study in Modern History can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of history, education, psychology, sociology, law, business, economics, politics, journalism, the media, writing, academia and strategic analysis.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  comprehend terms, issues and concepts

  devise historical questions and conduct research

  analyse historical sources and evidence

  synthesise information from historical sources and evidence

  evaluate historical interpretations and create responses that communicate meaning.

Prerequisites and Recommendations: Students are strongly encouraged to have achieved at least a C standard in Year 10 English and H.A.S.S.

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students, complete four summative assessments.  The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

Summative Assessment

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – General Subject

The knowledge, understanding and skills taught through Health and Physical Education enable students to explore and enhance their own and others’ health and physical activity in diverse and changing contexts. Development of the physical, intellectual, social and emotional capacities necessary in the strands of ‘Movement and physical activity’ and ‘Personal, social and community health’ is a key component of the P–10 Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education.

It provides the foundations for learning and alignment to the Physical Education and Health senior syllabuses to build increasingly complex and developmental courses of study in the senior years. In Physical Education, Arnold’s seminal work (1979, 1985, 1988) provides a philosophical and educative framework to promote deep learning in three dimensions: about, through and in movement contexts (Brown & Penney 2012; Stolz & Thorburn 2017).

Across the course of study, students will engage in a range of physical activities to develop movement sequences and movement strategies. Students optimise their engagement and performance in physical activity as they develop an understanding and appreciation of the interconnectedness of the dimensions. In becoming physically educated, students learn to see how body and movement concepts and the scientific bases of biophysical, sociocultural and psychological concepts and principles are relevant to their engagement and performance in physical activity.

The Physical Education syllabus is developmental and becomes increasingly complex across the four units.

In Unit 1, students develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles underpinning their learning of movement sequences and how they can enhance movement from a biomechanical perspective.

In Unit 2, students broaden their perspective by determining the psychological factors, barriers and enablers that influence their performance and engagement in physical activity.

In Unit 3, students enhance their understanding of factors that develop tactical awareness and influence ethical behaviour of their own and others’ performance in physical activity.

In Unit 4, students explore energy, fitness and training concepts and principles to optimise personal performance.

Students learn experientially through three stages of an inquiry approach to ascertain relationships between the scientific bases and the physical activity contexts. Students recognise and explain concepts and principles about and through movement, and demonstrate and apply body and movement concepts to movement sequences and movement strategies.

Through their purposeful and authentic experiences in physical activities, students gather, analyse and synthesise data to devise strategies to optimise engagement and performance. They evaluate and justify strategies about and in movement by drawing on informed, reflective decision-making.

Physically educated learners develop the 21st century skills of critical thinking, creative thinking, communication, personal and social skills, collaboration and teamwork, and information and communication technologies skills through rich and diverse learning experiences about, through and in physical activity. Physical Education fosters an appreciation of the values and knowledge within and across disciplines, and builds on students’ capacities to be self-directed, work towards specific goals, develop positive behaviours and establish lifelong active engagement in a wide range of pathways beyond school.

 

Pathways

Physical Education is a General subject suited to students who are interested in pathways that lead to tertiary studies, vocational education or work. A course of study in Physical Education can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of exercise science, biomechanics, the allied health professions, psychology, teaching, sport journalism, sport marketing and management, sport promotion, sport development and coaching.

 

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  •       Recognise and explain concepts and principles about movement
  •       Demonstrate specialised movement sequences and movement strategies
  •       Apply concepts to specialised movement sequences and movement strategies
  •       Analyse and synthesise data to devise strategies about movement
  •       Evaluate strategies about and in movement
  •       Justify strategies about and in movement
  •       Make decisions about and use language

Prerequisites and Recommendations: It is recommended that students have completed Year 10 Health and Physical Education. Students should have also received a B- or above for Year 10 English to facilitate project portfolio and investigative assessment genre utilised in Senior PE.

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

Summative Assessment

PHYSICS – General Subject

Physics provides opportunities for students to engage with the classical and modern understandings of the universe.

In Unit 1, students learn about the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, electricity and nuclear processes.

In Unit 2, students learn about the concepts and theories that predict and describe the linear motion of objects. Further, they will explore how scientists explain some phenomena using an understanding of waves.

In Unit 3, students engage with the concept of gravitational and electromagnetic fields, and the relevant forces associated with them.

Finally, in Unit 4, students study modern physics theories and models that, despite being counterintuitive, are fundamental to our understanding of many common observable phenomena.

Students will learn valuable skills required for the scientific investigation of questions. In addition, they will become citizens who are better informed about the world around them, and who have the critical skills to evaluate and make evidence-based decisions about current scientific issues.

Physics aims to develop students’:

  •     appreciation of the wonder of physics and the significant contribution physics has made to contemporary society
  •     understanding that diverse natural phenomena may be explained, analysed and predicted using concepts, models and theories that provide a reliable basis for action
  •     understanding of the ways in which matter and energy interact in physical systems across a range of scales
  •     understanding of the ways in which models and theories are refined, and new models and theories are developed in physics; and how physics knowledge is used in a wide range of contexts and informs personal, local and global issues
  •     investigative skills, including the design and conduct of investigations to explore phenomena and solve problems, the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, and the interpretation of evidence
  •     ability to use accurate and precise measurement, valid and reliable evidence, and scepticism and intellectual rigour to evaluate claims
  •     ability to communicate physics understanding, findings, arguments and conclusions using appropriate representations, modes and genres.

 

Pathways

Physics is a General subject suited to students who are interested in pathways beyond school that lead to tertiary studies.  A course of study in Physics can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of science, engineering, medicine and technology.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  describe and explain scientific concepts, theories, models and systems and their limitations

  apply understanding of scientific concepts, theories, models and systems within their limitations

  analyse evidence

  interpret evidence

  investigate phenomena

  evaluate processes, claims and conclusions

  communicate understandings, findings, arguments and conclusions.

 Prerequisites and Recommendations:

It is recommended that students have achieved at least a B standard in Year 10 in Science and Mathematics.

 Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students complete four summative assessments.  The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

Summative Assessment

SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS – General Subject

Specialist Mathematics’ major domains are Vectors & Matrices, Real & Complex Numbers, Trigonometry, Statistics and Calculus.

Specialist Mathematics is designed for students who develop confidence in their mathematical knowledge and ability, and gain a positive view of themselves as mathematics learners. They will gain an appreciation of the true nature of mathematics, its beauty and its power.

Students learn topics that are developed systematically, with increasing levels of sophistication, complexity and connection, building on functions, calculus, statistics from Mathematical Methods, while vectors, complex numbers and matrices are introduced. Functions and calculus are essential for creating models of the physical world. Statistics are used to describe and analyse phenomena involving probability, uncertainty and variation. Matrices, complex numbers and vectors are essential tools for explaining abstract or complex relationships that occur in scientific and technological endeavours.

Student learning experiences range from practising essential mathematical routines to developing procedural fluency, through to investigating scenarios, modelling the real world, solving problems and explaining reasoning.

Pathways

A course of study in Specialist Mathematics can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of science, all branches of mathematics and statistics, computer science, medicine, engineering, finance and economics.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  •       select, recall and use facts, rules, definitions and procedures drawn from Vectors & Matrices, Real & Complex numbers, Trigonometry, Statistics and Calculus
  •       comprehend mathematical concepts and techniques drawn from Vectors and matrices, Real and complex numbers, Trigonometry, Statistics and Calculus
  •       communicate using mathematical, statistical and everyday language and conventions
  •       evaluate the reasonableness of solutions
  •       justify procedures and decisions, and prove propositions by explaining mathematical reasoning
  •       solve problems by applying mathematical concepts and techniques drawn from Vectors & Matrices, Real & Complex numbers, Trigonometry, Statistics and Calculus.

Prerequisites and Recommendations

Specialist Mathematics is to be undertaken in conjunction with Mathematical Methods.

To meet the academic rigour of this course, it is recommended students have achieved at least a B in “Preparation for Mathematical Methods” (PMM) in Year 10.

Note: It is recommended that students consider choosing Physics if studying Specialist Mathematics.

A graphics calculator, Casio fx-CG50AU, is a requirement for this subject.

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students complete four summative assessments. The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A–E).


Summative Assessments

VISUAL ART – General Subject

Visual Art students have opportunities to construct knowledge and communicate personal interpretations by working as both artist and audience. In making artworks, students use their imagination and creativity to innovatively solve problems and experiment with visual language and expression. Students develop knowledge and skills when they create individualised responses and meaning by applying diverse materials, techniques, technologies and art processes. On their individual journey of exploration, students learn to communicate personal thoughts, feelings, ideas, experiences and observations. In responding to artworks, students investigate artistic expression and critically analyse artworks in diverse contexts. They consider meaning, purposes and theoretical approaches when ascribing aesthetic value and challenging ideas. Students interact with artists, artworks, institutions and communities to enrich their experiences and understandings of their own and others’ art practices.

Visual Art uses an inquiry learning model, developing critical and creative thinking skills and individual responses through developing, researching, reflecting and resolving. Through making and responding, resolution and display of artworks, students understand and appreciate the role of visual art in past and present traditions and cultures, as well as the contributions of contemporary visual artists and their aesthetic, historical and cultural influences.

This subject prepares young people for participation in the 21st century by fostering curiosity and imagination, and teaching students how to generate and apply new and creative solutions when problem-solving in a range of contexts. This learnt ability to think in divergent ways and produce creative and expressive responses enables future artists, designers and craftspeople to innovate and collaborate with the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to design and manufacture images and objects that enhance and contribute significantly to our daily lives.

Visual Art prepares students to engage in a multimodal, media-saturated world that is reliant on visual communication. Through the critical thinking and literacy skills essential to both artist and audience, learning in Visual Art empowers young people to be discriminating, and to engage with and make sense of what they see and experience. Visual Art equips students for a future of unimagined possibilities as they develop highly transferable communication skills and the capacity for global thinking. Visual Art encourages students to reflect on and appreciate multiple perspectives and philosophies, and to confidently and creatively contribute and engage in all facets of society to sustain our diverse Australian culture.

Pathways

Visual Art is a General subject suited to students who are interested in pathways beyond school that lead to tertiary studies, vocational education or work. A course of study in Visual Art can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of arts practice, design, craft, and information technologies; broader areas in creative industries and cultural institutions; and diverse fields that use skills inherent in the subject. The processes and practices of Visual Art, such as self-directed learning and creative problemsolving, develop transferable 21st century skills that are highly valued in many areas of employment. Organisations increasingly seek employees who demonstrate work-related creativity, innovative thinking and diversity.

Tertiary studies, vocational education or work experience in the area of visual arts can lead to and benefit careers in diverse fields such as:

  •   advertising, e.g. art director, brand specialist, content marketer, photographer, graphic artist
  •   arts administration and management, e.g. art project manager, agent, events and festivals manager
  •   communication, e.g. writer, communication strategist, journalist, sign writer, art editor, blogger/vlogger, web content producer
  •   creative industries, e.g. visual artist, illustrator, photographer, screenwriter
  •   design, e.g. architect, fashion designer, environmental designer, fashion marketer, graphic designer, industrial designer, interior designer, stage designer, textiles designer
  •   education, e.g. specialist classroom teacher, lecturer, private teacher
  •   galleries and museums, e.g. curator, registrar, exhibition designer, director, public programs officer, conservator
  •   film and television, e.g. animator, storyboard artist, post-production specialist, art director, production buyer, concept artist, costume designer, camera operator, Foley editor, producer
  •   public relations, e.g. campaign manager, publicist, creative director
  •   science and technology, e.g. visual translator, medical illustrator, computer game developer/programmer, digital communication specialist, digital content producer, multimedia designer, web designer, computer graphics modeller, forensic photographer.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  •       implement ideas and representations
  •       apply literacy skills
  •       analyse and interpret visual language, expression and meaning in artworks and practices
  •       evaluate art practices, traditions, cultures and theories When students evaluate, they reflect on and appraise the ideas, value, and significance of visual language and expression in artworks.
  •       justify viewpoints
  •       experiment in response to stimulus
  •       create meaning through the knowledge and understanding of materials, techniques, technologies and art processes
  •       realise responses to communicate meaning

 

Prerequisites and Recommendations:

Prior experience in any or all of The Arts subjects will provide students with an understanding of making and responding as learning and assessment in Visual Art.

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students complete four summative assessments.  The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A-E).

Summative Assessment

Applied Senior Secondary Subjects

APPLIED

AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES – Applied Subject

 Agricultural Practices provides opportunities for students to explore, experience and learn knowledge and practical skills valued in agricultural workplaces and other settings.

Through these learning experiences, students build their understanding of expectations for work in agricultural settings and develop an understanding of career pathways, jobs and other opportunities available for participating in and contributing to agricultural activities.

Agricultural Practices includes two areas of study, ‘Animal studies’ and ‘Plant studies’, which focus on building knowledge and skills suited to practical situations in agricultural workplaces. Schools decide whether to include one or both of the areas of study in their course of study. Learning in the selected areas of study is delivered through modules of work set in specific animal and plant contexts, such as poultry, vegetables or conservation areas. ‘Safety and management practices’ are embedded across both areas of study and focus on building knowledge and skills in working safely, effectively and efficiently in practical agricultural situations. These practices include skills needed to work effectively as an individual and as part of a team, to build relationships with peers, colleagues and wider networks, to collaborate and communicate appropriately with others, and to plan, organise and complete tasks on time. These skills are valued in all settings where people work together, and therefore position students for successful transition to work, training and other collaborative environments.

In the course of study, students learn the core topics for the included area/s of study and ‘Safety and management practices’, plus at least two elective topics by midway through the course (end of Unit 2) and again by the end of the course (end of Unit 4).

Pathways

A course of study in Agricultural Practices can establish a basis for further education, training and employment in agriculture, aquaculture, food technology, environmental management and agribusiness. The subject also provides a basis for participating in and contributing to community associations, events and activities, such as agricultural shows.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students should:

  •       demonstrate procedures to complete tasks in agricultural activities
  •       describe and explain concepts, ideas and processes relevant to agricultural activities
  •       analyse agricultural information
  •       apply knowledge, understanding and skills relevant to agricultural activities
  •       use appropriate language conventions and features for communication of agricultural information
  •       plan processes for agricultural activities
  •       make decisions and recommendations with evidence for agricultural activities
  •       evaluate processes and decisions regarding safety and effectiveness.

 

When students plan processes, they collect information to design a detailed proposal of processes for agricultural activities. When students make decisions, they reach a conclusion or resolution after considering agricultural activities.

When students make recommendations, they consider improvements and/or alternatives to improve results in future activities. When students provide evidence, the include justifications to support decisions and recommendations. When students evaluate processes and decisions, they assign merit according to the criteria of safety and effectiveness. Criteria could be developed by the teacher or student/s. Examples of criteria include safety, effectiveness, cost, time-efficiency and environmental impact.

Prerequisites and Recommendations: Nil

Structure

 Assessment

Agricultural Practices assessment techniques

Project Collection of work Investigation Extended response Examination

Schools design assessment instruments from the assessment techniques relevant to this syllabus. The assessment instruments students respond to in Units 1 and 2 should support those techniques used in Units 3 and 4. For each assessment instrument, schools develop an instrument-specific standards matrix by selecting the syllabus standards descriptors relevant to the task and the dimension/s being assessed (see Standards matrix).

The matrix is used as a tool for making judgements about the quality of students’ responses to the instrument and is developed using the syllabus standards descriptors. Assessment is designed to allow students to demonstrate the range of standards (see Determining an exit result). Teachers give students an instrument-specific standards matrix for each assessment instrument.

ESSENTIAL ENGLISH – Applied Subject

Essential English develops and refines students’ understanding of language, literature and literacy to enable them to interact confidently and effectively with others in everyday, community and social contexts.

Students recognise language and texts as relevant in their lives now and in the future and learn to understand, accept or challenge the values and attitudes in these texts. Students engage with language and texts to foster skills to communicate confidently and effectively in Standard Australian English in a variety of contemporary contexts and social situations, including everyday, social, community, further education and work-related contexts. They choose generic structures, language, language features and technologies to best convey meaning. They develop skills to read for meaning and purpose, and to use, critique and appreciate a range of contemporary literary and non-literary texts.

Students use language effectively to produce texts for a variety of purposes and audiences and engage creative and imaginative thinking to explore their own world and the worlds of others. They actively and critically interact with a range of texts, developing an awareness of how the language they engage with positions them and others.

Pathways

A course of study in Essential English promotes open-mindedness, imagination, critical awareness and intellectual flexibility — skills that prepare students for local and global citizenship, and for lifelong learning across a wide range of contexts.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  1. use patterns and conventions of genres to suit particular purposes and audiences
  2. use appropriate roles and relationships with audiences
  3. construct and explain representations of identities, places, events and concepts
  4. make use of and explain the ways cultural assumptions, attitudes, values and beliefs underpin texts and influence meaning
  5. explain how language features and text structures shape meaning and invite particular responses
  6. select and use subject matter to support perspectives
  7. sequence subject matter and use mode-appropriate cohesive devices to construct coherent texts
  8. make mode-appropriate language choices according to register informed by purpose, audience and context
  9. use language features to achieve particular purposes across modes.

Prerequisites and Recommendations: None

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students, complete four summative assessments.  Schools develop three summative internal assessments and the common internal assessment (CIA) is developed by the QCAA.

Summative Assessment

ESSENTIAL MATHEMATICS – Applied Subject

 Essential Mathematics’ major domains are Number, Data, Location & Time, Measurement and Finance.

Essential Mathematics benefits students because they develop skills that go beyond the traditional ideas of numeracy.  Students develop their conceptual understanding when they undertake tasks that require them to connect mathematical concepts, operations and relations. They learn to recognise definitions, rules and facts from everyday mathematics and data, and to calculate using appropriate mathematical processes.

Students interpret and use mathematics to make informed predictions and decisions about personal and financial priorities. This is achieved through an emphasis on estimation, problem-solving and reasoning, which develops students into thinking citizens.

Pathways

A course of study in Essential Mathematics can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of trade, industry, business and community services. Students learn within a practical context related to general employment and successful participation in society, drawing on the mathematics used by various professional and industry groups.

Objectives

 By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  •       select, recall and use facts, rules, definitions and procedures drawn from Number, Data, Location & Time, Measurement and Finance
  •       comprehend mathematical concepts and techniques drawn from Number, Data, Location & Time, Measurement and Finance and communicate using mathematical, statistical and everyday language and conventions
  •       evaluate the reasonableness of solutions
  •       justify procedures and decisions by explaining mathematical reasoning
  •       solve problems by applying mathematical concepts and techniques drawn from Number, Data, Location & Time, Measurement and Finance.

Prerequisites and Recommendations

Recommended for students receiving at least a C in “Preparation for Essential Mathematics” in semester 1 of Year 10.

Structure

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

In Units 3 and 4 students, complete four summative assessments. The College will develop three summative internal assessments and the common internal assessment (CIA) is developed by the QCAA.

Summative Assessment

INDUSTRIAL GRAPHICS SKILLS - Applied Subject

Industrial Graphics Skills focuses on the underpinning industry practices and production processes required to produce the technical drawings used in a variety of industries, including building and construction, engineering and furnishing.

Students understand industry practices, interpret technical information and drawings, demonstrate and apply safe practical modelling procedures with tools and materials, communicate using oral and written modes, organise and produce technical drawings and evaluate drawings using specifications.

Students develop transferable skills by engaging in drafting and modelling tasks that relate to business and industry, and that promote adaptable, competent, self-motivated and safe individuals who can work with colleagues to solve problems and complete tasks.

Pathways

A course of study in Industrial Graphics Skills can establish a basis for further education and employment in a range of roles and trades in the manufacturing industries. With additional training and experience, potential employment opportunities may be found in drafting roles such as architectural drafter, estimator, mechanical drafter, electrical drafter, structural drafter, civil drafter and survey drafter.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  describe industry practices in drafting and modelling tasks

  demonstrate fundamental drawing skills

  interpret drawings and technical information

  analyse drafting tasks to organise information

  select and apply drawing skills and procedures in drafting tasks

  use language conventions and features to communicate for particular purposes

  construct models from drawings í create technical drawings from industry requirements

  evaluate industry practices, drafting processes and drawings, and make recommendations.

Prerequisites and Recommendations: Nil

Structure

The Industrial Graphics Skills course is designed around core and elective topics.

Assessment

Units 1 and 2 assessment will generally mirror the summative assessment for Units 3 and 4.

For Industrial Graphic Skills, assessment from Units 3 and 4 is used to determine the students’ exit result and consists of instruments, including:

          At least two projects

          At least one practical demonstration (separate to the assessable component of a project)

Summative Assessment

RELIGION AND ETHICS – Applied Subject

A sense of purpose and personal integrity are essential for participative and contributing members of society. This Applied syllabus provides for a course of study that encourages students to explore their personal values and life choices and the ways in which these are related to their beliefs. Religion and Ethics helps students understand the personal, relational and spiritual perspectives of human experience. A search for meaning assists students from different cultural, social, linguistic and economic backgrounds to learn about and reflect on the richness of religious and ethical worldviews.

Religion and Ethics enhances students’ understanding of how personal beliefs, values and spiritual identity are shaped and influenced by factors such as family, culture, gender, race, class and economic issues. It allows for flexible courses of study that recognise the varied needs and interests of students through investigating topics such as the meaning of life, spirituality, purpose and destiny, life choices, moral and ethical issues and justice. The course also explores how these topics are dealt with in various religious, spiritual and ethical traditions.

In the context of this syllabus, religion is understood as a faith tradition based on a common understanding of beliefs and practices; spirituality refers to a transcendent reality that connects a person with humanity and the universe. The term ethics refers to a system of moral principles; the rules of conduct or approaches to making decisions for the good of the individual and society. In a religious sense, beliefs are tenets, creeds or faiths; religious belief is belief in a power or powers that influence human behaviours.

Religion and Ethics focuses on the personal, relational and spiritual perspectives of human experience. It enables students to investigate and critically reflect on the role and function of religion and ethics in society. Within this syllabus, the focus is on students gaining knowledge and understanding, on developing the ability to think critically, and to communicate concepts and ideas relevant to their lives and the world in which they live.

Learning experiences should be practical and experiential in emphasis. A course of study should recognise the benefits of networking within the community. Schools may consider involvement with religious communities, charities, welfare and service groups and organisations that are engaged in areas related to ethics and justice. It is important that students learn to respect and interact with members of the wider community who may express beliefs and values different from their own.

Pathways

A course of study in Religion and Ethics can establish a basis for further education and employment in any field, as it helps students develop the skills and personal attributes necessary for engaging efficiently, effectively and positively in future life roles. It provides them with opportunities to gain knowledge and understanding of themselves as human beings, to clarify their personal beliefs and ethical values, and to assess their personal choices, vision and goals.

It helps students develop an understanding of themselves in the context of their family, their community and the workplace. The focus on citizenship, the sense of community and service, ethical principles, moral understanding and reasoning, and the responsibilities of the individual within the community provide students with skills and attitudes that contribute to lifelong learning, and a basis for engaging with others in diverse settings, including further education and the workforce.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students should:

  •     organise information and material related to religion, beliefs and ethics
  •     analyse perspectives, viewpoints and practices related to religion, beliefs and ethics
  •     apply concepts and ideas to make decisions about inquiries
  •     use language conventions and features to communicate ideas and information, according to purposes.

When students organise, they locate, select, classify and order relevant information about religion, beliefs and ethics. When students analyse, they dissect information to explore and examine alternative viewpoints, showing recognition and significance of patterns, similarities and differences.

When students apply, they demonstrate their understanding of concepts and ideas by using them in religious and ethical contexts, and by interpreting information in order to make decisions. When students use language conventions and features, they use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, vocabulary, text types and structures in written, oral and visual communication modes.

Structure

Assessment

TOURISM - Applied Subject

Tourism is one of the world’s largest industries, directly employing approximately 105 million people and accounting for 9.8% of the global gross domestic product. Tourism is also one of Australia’s most important industries, assuming increasing value as a source of expanding business and employment opportunities.

The Tourism Applied syllabus is designed to give students a variety of intellectual, technical, operational and workplace skills. It enables students to gain an appreciation of the role of the tourism industry and the structure, scope and operation of the related tourism sectors of travel, hospitality and visitor services.

In Tourism, students examine the socio-cultural, environmental and economic aspects of tourism, as well as tourism opportunities, problems and issues across global, national and local contexts. Tourism provides opportunities for Queensland students to develop understandings that are geographically and culturally significant to them by, for example, investigating tourism activities related to local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Pathways

A course of study in Tourism can establish a basis for further education and employment in businesses and industries such as tourist attractions, cruising, gaming, government and industry organisations, meeting and events coordination, caravan parks, marketing, museums and galleries, tour operations, wineries, cultural liaison, tourism and leisure industry development, and transport and travel.

SUBJECT MATTER

ASSESSMENT

VISUAL ARTS IN PRACTICE – Applied Subject

Visual Arts in Practice foregrounds the role visual arts plays in the community and how students may become involved in community arts activities. This subject focuses on students engaging in artmaking processes and making virtual or physical visual artworks for a purpose. This occurs in two to four of the following areas — 2D, 3D, digital and 4D, design, and craft.

Students may create images, objects, environments or events to communicate aesthetic meaning. The aesthetic meaning will be conveyed in response to a particular purpose and for a particular audience. While this will always be personal, the student may also be asked to consider, use or appropriate aesthetic qualities from various sources, cultures, times and places. Students’ perspectives and visual literacies are shaped by these aesthetic considerations when creating communications and artworks. In each area of study they undertake, students of Visual Arts in Practice develop and apply knowledge, understanding and skills from three core topics — ‘Visual mediums, technologies and techniques’, ‘Visual literacies and contexts’ and ‘Artwork realisation’.

In ‘Visual mediums, technologies and techniques’, students explore and apply the materials, technologies and techniques used in art-making both individually and in groups to express ideas that serve particular purposes. They examine how visual arts may be a vocation and identify vocationally transferable visual art skills. They investigate and apply display and curatorial skills. They will learn and apply safe visual art practices.

When students engage in subject matter from ‘Visual literacies and contexts’, they interpret, negotiate and make meaning from information presented in the form of visual texts. They use information about design elements and principles to influence their own aesthetic and guide how they view others’ works. They also investigate information about artists, art movements and theories, and use the lens of a context to examine influences on art-making.

In ‘Artwork realisation’, students are asked to reflect on both their own and others’ art-making processes. They integrate skills to create artworks and evaluate aesthetic choices. Students decide on the best way to convey meaning through communications and artworks.

Pathways

A course of study in Visual Arts in Practice can establish a basis for further education and employment in fields of:

  •       design, styling, decorating, illustrating, drafting, visual merchandising, makeup artistry, advertising, game design, photography, animation or ceramics.

Objectives

The objectives describe what students should know and be able to do by the end of the course of study. Progress in a particular dimension may depend on the knowledge, understanding and skills developed in other dimensions.

Learning through each of the dimensions increases in complexity to allow for greater independence for learners over a four-unit course of study. The dimensions for a course of study in this subject are:

 ∙ Dimension 1: Knowing and understanding

∙ Dimension 2: Applying and analysing

∙ Dimension 3: Creating and evaluating.

Prerequisites and Recommendations:

It is recommended that students have studied Visual Arts in Years 9 and 10.

Structure

Assessment

Schools design assessment instruments from the assessment techniques relevant to this syllabus. The assessment instruments students respond to in Units 1 and 2 should support those techniques included in Units 3 and 4.

For each assessment instrument, schools develop an instrument-specific standards matrix by selecting the syllabus standards descriptors relevant to the task and the dimension/s being assessed (see Standards matrix).

The matrix is used as a tool for making judgments about the quality of students’ responses to the instrument and is developed using the syllabus standards descriptors. Assessment is designed to allow students to demonstrate the range of standards (see Determining an exit result). Teachers give students an instrument-specific standards matrix for each assessment instrument.

Vocational Education and Training (VET) Certificate Courses

VET

Cert I Automotive Vocational Preparation (AUR10120)

Certificate II in Engineering Pathways (MEM20413)

Certificate II in Retail Cosmetics (SHB20116)

Certificate II in Salon Assistant (SHB20216)

Certificate II in Hospitality (SIT20322)

Certificate I in Construction (CPC10120)

Certificate III in School Based Education Support (CHC30221)

Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care (CHC30121 )

Certificate II in Health Support Services (HLT23215)
Certificate III in Health Services Assistant (HLT33115) (including HLT23215 Certificate II in Health Support Services)
Certificate II in Electrotechnology (UEE22011)
Dual Qualification: Certificate II in Sport and Recreation (SIS20115) + Certificate III in Sport and Recreation (SIS30115) *includes First Aid Certificate
Certificate III in Business (BSB30120)
APPENDIX 1

Guidelines on Changing Subjects

 

  1. NO subject changes are to be made in Year 12
  2. Changes to subjects throughout the senior years will only occur in the first 3 weeks of the Unit or at the end of a Unit.
  3. Any student wishing to request a subject change must complete the relevant form available from Student Reception.
  4. No changes to subjects will take place unless there are vacancies to accommodate such requests.
  5. All year 11 students will undertake 7 subjects. All year 12 will undertake 6 subjects.

In some cases of special consideration, students in Years 11-12 may take less subjects. Special Consideration may include:

  • Enrolment in a, School Based Apprenticeship (SAT) or Traineeship or external course
  • Medical
  • Other serious reasons
  • To maintain eligibility for an ATAR score or Selection Rank, students must do 5 General subjects per Semester or 4 General Subjects and 1 Certificate III or Applied subject plus meet the QCE requirements
APPENDIX 2

Glossary of Key Terms

 

The following brief explanation of some terms you need to become familiar with during Years 11 and 12:

  • Advanced standing refers to the credit granted to a student towards an accredited course or training program based on previous study, experience or competencies held.
  • Articulation is the process used to progress from one level of qualification to another.
  • The Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) shows all the qualifications issued in post-compulsory education in Australia and how these qualifications relate to each other.
  • Competencies are the knowledge and skills a person must have to gain a specific job or to gain a specific AQTF/VET qualification.
  • Credit transfer recognises previous formal study or training based on documented evidence of achievement. For instance, modules assessed as competent in an Authority or Authority-Registered subject may attract credit for a subject in a TAFE diploma.
  • Prerequisite A subject or qualification required for eligibility for entry to a particular course of study or future career.
  • Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) is the name of the qualification which may be awarded at the completion of Year 12, or for up to 9 years after a student's learning account is opened (usually Year 10 or 11), when sufficient 'credits' have been gained.
  • Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre Ltd (QTAC) acts on behalf of universities and TAFE institutes to publish course information and requirements, to provide application materials and to receive and process applications.
  • Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is the process used to assess the competencies a person has gained from experience and training. RPL is a form of assessment and each person is treated individually.
  • Recommended (or desirable) subjects are not essential, but are likely to make future courses easier to follow.
  • Senior Statement is the name given to the record of results achieved by students who have completed Year 12 at a school.
  • Statement of Results is the name given to the record of results achieved by students not enrolled in a school and includes any credits achieved during their years at school.
APPENDIX 3

Types of Subjects in the Senior School

 

  1. General Subjects are those for which the school's work program is based on a syllabus common to schools throughout Queensland.
  2. Applied Subjects
  3. Vocational Studies

Vocational Education and Training (VET). Some Senior School subjects are linked to the entry-level requirements of industry and form part of the AQF (Australian Qualifications Framework). Some subjects offer embedded units of competency whilst other subjects are offered as 'Stand-alone VET'. Successful completion of these competencies gains national accreditation and provides for a variety of career pathways and further vocational studies. All national vocational competencies require students to undertake structured work placement where skills gained or demonstrated will be recorded in a log book.

Distance Education / Private Provider Courses. In order to broaden vocational options, senior students may enrol in accredited subjects at TAFE, Queensland School of Distance Education, etc. An expression of interest is required in November and May of each year. Students need to be committed to completing the courses, be prepared to pay tuition and material costs and are required to arrange their own transport. A certificate is issued on completion of the course and many subjects are recorded on the Senior Statement and may contribute credits towards the Queensland Certificate of Education.

 School Based Apprenticeships (SATs). Year 10, 11 & 12 students may undertake school-based apprenticeships/traineeships (SATS). Students may complete a SAT as part of their senior school studies and at the same time engage in recognised training and paid work. SATs may exit Year 12 with a Senior Statement outlining their achievement in a vocational qualification as well as their general studies. SATS are essentially no different from mainstream apprenticeships/traineeships. A training contract must be completed and registered through the Department of Education and Training (DET). The key difference is the integration of school studies, training & paid work, detailed in the Education Training and Employment Schedule (ETES) completed for each SAT. Application for SATs should start with an appointment with the Careers Advisor.

  

 

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